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A Life Worth Living: Suicide Prevention

Friday, December 18, 2020
By Lori Malone
Young Girl Looking Sad in front of Window

Duke psychologists are employing the “SAFETY-Acute” intervention for adolescents and young adults who are experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviors to help them cope with their feelings and stay safe when they are in distress. The result of the intervention is a family safety plan that details warning signs, coping skills, ways to ensure safety, and support resources. Another important aspect of the SAFETY-Acute Intervention is connection to appropriate longer-term care, where youth can continue important mental health services.

“When adolescents and young adults have suicidal thoughts, we use a cognitive behavioral approach that builds on youth and family strengths to help young people remain safe and get them to a better place.”

“When adolescents and young adults have suicidal thoughts, we use a cognitive behavioral approach that builds on youth and family strengths to help young people remain safe and get them to a better place,” says David B. Goldston, PhD, a child and family clinical psychologist who works primarily with patients who struggle with anxiety, depression, substance use, and suicidal thoughts.

Read the latest from Duke Health's Clinical Practice Today series to learn more about Goldston's approach and the "“SAFETY-Acute” intervention.