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Addiction

(Left) Joe McClernon, PhD; (Right) Scott Kollins, PhDThe Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences seeks to promote discovery of the causes, consequences and treatments of addictive behavior, and to translate this knowledge in ways that improve the health of individuals, families and our community.

In addition, we discover effective new treatments for addictions and understand the addicted brain with leading researchers in the areas of smoking cessation, alcoholism, substance abuse and adolescent addictions. 

We also treat adolescent, young adult and adult patients suffering from substance use disorders, alcoholism, nicotine addiction and other areas of addiction.

Faculty conduct internationally-recognized research across a broad spectrum of mental health areas related to substance use and addictions, including understanding how addictions change the functions of the brain, creating innovative therapies for treating those in our care and discovering the co-morbidities between addictions and other mental illnesses. 

Addiction Neurobiology

The Addiction Neurobiology lab is focused on the effects of drugs of abuse on brain and behavioral function, with a particular interest in adolescent brain development and how drugs interact with the brain during that period - producing both distinct effects during adolescence, and long-term effects that persist into adulthood. The goal is to understand the neural mechanism that underlie those drug effects and to contribute to the development of treatments to prevent and/or reverse them. Much of the recent focus has been on the enduring effects of adolescent alcohol exposure as a part of the national Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) consortium.

 

Faculty:

Duke Center for Addiction Science and Technology

Duke Center for Addiction Science and Technology (CfAST) investigators and affiliated faculty are dedicated to improving the lives of people, families and our communities by increasing our understanding of addiction, developing novel interventions to help those most in need, and informing regulators and policy makers. CfAST was founded by its director, F. Joseph McClernon, PhD, with the mission of generating new insights into the causes and consequences of addiction and translating those insights into new and more effective prevention and treatment strategies.

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Duke Center for Smoking Cessation

The Duke Center for Smoking Cessation is a multidisciplinary, multi-site center working to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying tobacco addiction and to promote the development of more effective smoking cessation treatments.
 

Faculty

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HIV and Addictions Research Program

The HIV and Addictions Research Program (HARP) seeks to understand and develop interventions, both locally and globally, to improve HIV-related health outcomes among people who use cocaine, methamphetamine and marijuana. Our research focuses on the neuropsychiatric basis of health risk behaviors among vulnerable populations, integrating neuroimaging and behavioral assessment strategies, with projects in the United States and South Africa.
 

Faculty

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Levin Lab

The Levin Lab—led by Ed Levin, PhD—conducts research concerning the neurobehavioral bases of cognitive, emotional and addictive function in animal models. Research is focused on understanding the functional interactions of cholinergic systems with other brain areas and systems.
 

Faculty

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Kollins Lab

The Kollins Lab—led by Scott Kollins, PhD—seeks to understand the behavioral, neuropharmacological and genetic basis of smoking among people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) using human laboratory psychopharmacology studies. We also explore the effects of secondhand smoke exposure on neurodevelopment and evaluates new pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for children and adults with ADHD.
 

Faculty

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McClernon Lab/Triangle Smoking Studies

The McClernon Lab/Triangle Smoking Studies—led by Joe McClernon, PhD—investigates the neural and behavioral bases of tobacco use and other addictive behaviors, the comorbidity between addiction and mental illness, and the development of novel technologies to improve treatment outcomes. The public face of the lab, Triangle Smoking Studies, recruits smokers from the Triangle area to participate in research.
 

Faculty

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VA Alcohol Research Group

VA Alcohol Research Group uses preclinical neurophysiological and behavioral methods to understand the neural basis of substance abuse. Researchers in this lab are particularly interested in adolescence as a neurologically and psychosocially significant phase for the initiation of and sensitivity to drug use.

 

Faculty

Click on Dr. Moore's name to view his profile, including his grants and publications.