Skip to main content

Sofia Rydin-Gray, PhD

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Division: 
Adult Psychiatry & Psychology
Category: 
Office: Duke Lifestyle Change and Weight Management Ctr , 501 Dougla, Durham, NC 27705
Campus Mail: DUMC Box 3829 Med Ctr., Durham, NC 27710

Sofia Rydin-Gray, PhH, specializes in assessing and treating the behavioral and emotional components of weight management, binge eating, and other lifestyle related conditions that interfere with quality of life. Her main therapeutic approaches are CBT and DBT and she also incorporates somatic experiencing and internal family system therapy. Her research has focused on understanding the immediate and distal triggers of binge eating, food cravings, as well as behavioral weight loss interventions.  She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University in 2007 and she is a Licensed Psychologist and certified as a Health Services Provider in North Carolina. Dr Rydin-Gray is the Behavioral Health Director at Duke Diet and Fitness Center, a residential style weight management program, and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the DFC (2007-2009) and her clinical internship in behavioral medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina (2006-2007).

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., Bowling Green State University, 2007

Publications

Barth, Kelly S., Sofia Rydin-Gray, Samet Kose, Jeffrey J. Borckardt, Patrick M. O’Neil, Darlene Shaw, Alok Madan, Amanda Budak, and Mark S. George. “Food cravings and the effects of left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation using an improved sham condition.” Front Psychiatry 2 (2011): 9. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2011.00009.

Full Text

Borckardt, Jeffrey J., John Walker, R Kyle Branham, Sofia Rydin-Gray, Caroline Hunter, Heather Beeson, Scott T. Reeves, Alok Madan, Harold Sackeim, and Mark S. George. “Development and evaluation of a portable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation system.” Brain Stimul 1, no. 1 (January 2008): 52–59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2007.09.003.

Full Text

Carels, R. A., H. M. Cacciapaglia, S. Rydin, O. M. Douglass, and J. Harper. “Can social desirability interfere with success in a behavioral weight loss program?” Psychology and Health 21, no. 1 (February 1, 2006): 65–78. https://doi.org/10.1080/14768320500102277.

Full Text

Carels, Robert A., Lynn Darby, Holly M. Cacciapaglia, Olivia M. Douglass, Jessica Harper, Mary E. Kaplar, Krista Konrad, Sofia Rydin, and Karin Tonkin. “Applying a stepped-care approach to the treatment of obesity.” J Psychosom Res 59, no. 6 (December 2005): 375–83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.06.060.

Full Text

Carels, Robert A., Lynn A. Darby, Sofia Rydin, Olivia M. Douglass, Holly M. Cacciapaglia, and William H. O’Brien. “The relationship between self-monitoring, outcome expectancies, difficulties with eating and exercise, and physical activity and weight loss treatment outcomes.” Ann Behav Med 30, no. 3 (December 2005): 182–90. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15324796abm3003_2.

Full Text

Carels, Robert A., Lynn A. Darby, Olivia M. Douglass, Holly M. Cacciapaglia, and Sofia Rydin. “Education on the glycemic index of foods fails to improve treatment outcomes in a behavioral weight loss program.” Eat Behav 6, no. 2 (February 2005): 145–50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2004.08.005.

Full Text