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Rachel Alison Adcock, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Associate Professor of Neurobiology
Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
Division: 
Translational Neuroscience
Category: 
Office: Center for Cognitive Neuroscie, Durham, NC 27708
Campus Mail: DUMC Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708-0999

Dr. Adcock received her undergraduate degree in psychology from Emory University and her MD and PhD in Neurobiology from Yale University.  She completed her psychiatry residency training at Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute at UC-San Francisco and did neurosciences research as a postdoctoral fellow at UC-SF, the San Francisco VA Medical Center, and Stanford before joining the Duke faculty in 2007. Her work has been funded by NIDA, NIMH, NSF and Alfred P. Sloan and Klingenstein Fellowships in the Neurosciences, and the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, and honored by NARSAD awards, the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Seymour Benzer Lectureship, and the 2015 ABAI BF Skinner Lectureship. The overall goals of her research program are to understand how brain systems for motivation support learning and to use mechanistic understanding of how behavior changes biology to meet the challenge of developing new therapies appropriate for early interventions for mental illness.

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., Yale University, 1999
  • M.D., Yale University School of Medicine, 1999

Publications

Haugg, Amelie, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, Amalia McDonald, Cameron Craddock, Matthias Kirschner, Marcus Herdener, et al. “Can we predict real-time fMRI neurofeedback learning success from pretraining brain activity?” Hum Brain Mapp, July 30, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25089.

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Botvinik-Nezer, Rotem, Felix Holzmeister, Colin F. Camerer, Anna Dreber, Juergen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, et al. “Variability in the analysis of a single neuroimaging dataset by many teams.” Nature 582, no. 7810 (June 2020): 84–88. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2314-9.

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Ho, New Fei, Daphne J. Holt, Mike Cheung, Juan Eugenio Iglesias, Alex Goh, Mingyuan Wang, Joseph K. W. Lim, et al. “Correction: Progressive decline in hippocampal CA1 volume in individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis who do not remit: findings from the longitudinal youth at risk study.” Neuropsychopharmacology 44, no. 12 (November 2019): 2144. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-019-0477-6.

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Erwin, Savannah R., Stephanie Ng, Shabnam Hakimi, Sonakchhi Shrestha, Kathryn Silberstein, Rachael Wright, R Alison Adcock, and Nancy L. Zucker. “2.19 HARNESSING PERFECTIONISM: THE ROLE OF EMOTION REGULATION AND REWARD EXPERIENCE.” In Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 58:S177–S177. Elsevier BV, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2019.08.111.

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Stanek, Jessica K., Kathryn C. Dickerson, Kimberly S. Chiew, Nathaniel J. Clement, and R Alison Adcock. “Expected Reward Value and Reward Uncertainty Have Temporally Dissociable Effects on Memory Formation.” J Cogn Neurosci 31, no. 10 (October 2019): 1443–54. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01411.

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Adcock, Rachel, Kathryn Dickerson, Jeff MacInnes, and R Alison Adcock. “144. Cognitive Neurostimulation: Volitional Regulation of Ventral Tegmental Area.” In Biological Psychiatry, 85:S60–S60. Elsevier BV, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.158.

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Duffy, Korrina A., Bruce Luber, R Alison Adcock, and Tanya L. Chartrand. “Enhancing activation in the right temporoparietal junction using theta-burst stimulation: Disambiguating between two hypotheses of top-down control of behavioral mimicry.” Plos One 14, no. 1 (2019): e0211279. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0211279.

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Wang, Chenhao, Jimmy Lee, New Fei Ho, Joseph K. W. Lim, Joann S. Poh, Gurpreet Rekhi, Ranga Krishnan, et al. “Large-Scale Network Topology Reveals Heterogeneity in Individuals With at Risk Mental State for Psychosis: Findings From the Longitudinal Youth-at-Risk Study.” Cereb Cortex 28, no. 12 (December 1, 2018): 4234–43. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhx278.

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Dickerson, Kathryn, Katherine MacDuffie, Jeff MacInnes, Kari Eddington, Timothy Strauman, and R Alison Adcock. “Real-Time fMRI as a CBT Adjunct: Predicting the Behavioral Impact of Neurofeedback.” In Neuropsychopharmacology, 43:S125–26. NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018.

Scholars@Duke

Dickerson, Kathryn, Katherine MacDuffie, Jeff MacInnes, Kari Eddington, Timothy Strauman, and R Alison Adcock. “T157. Using Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback as a Tool for Demonstrating Therapeutic Efficacy.” In Biological Psychiatry, 83:S189–S189. Elsevier BV, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.02.494.

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