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Noga Zerubavel, PhD

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Division: 
General Psychiatry
Category: 
Office: 2213 Elba Street, Durham, NC 27705

Noga Zerubavel, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Zerubavel is the Director of the Stress, Trauma, and Recovery Treatment Clinic (START Clinic), which provides treatment for trauma-related disorders including PTSD, dissociative disorders, and other sequelae of trauma within the Cognitive Behavioral Research and Treatment Program at Duke. She specializes in working with individuals who have experienced interpersonal victimization, including intimate partner violence and sexual trauma. She also works with individuals with mood, anxiety, eating disorders, substance use, and personality disorders. Dr. Zerubavel has clinical expertise in cognitive behavioral and mindfulness-based approaches to psychotherapy, including dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), and supervises psychiatry residents and clinical psychology predoctoral interns in these approaches. She is part of the Duke Center for Eating Disorders and on the faculty of the Family Studies Program.

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., Miami University, 2013

Publications

Reinhardt, Kristen M., Noga Zerubavel, Anna S. Young, Mavis Gallo, Nikita Ramakrishnan, Alexandra Henry, and Nancy L. Zucker. “A multi-method assessment of interoception among sexual trauma survivors.” Physiology & Behavior 226 (November 2020): 113108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.113108.

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Nagy, G. A., K. LeMaire, M. L. Miller, M. Howard, K. Wyatt, and N. Zerubavel. “Development and Implementation of a Multicultural Consultation Service Within an Academic Medical Center.” Cognitive and Behavioral Practice 26, no. 4 (November 1, 2019): 656–75. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2019.02.004.

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McClintock, A. S., M. A. Rodriguez, and N. Zerubavel. “The Effects of Mindfulness Retreats on the Psychological Health of Non-clinical Adults: a Meta-analysis.” Mindfulness 10, no. 8 (August 15, 2019): 1443–54. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-019-01123-9.

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Zerubavel, Noga, Terri L. Messman-Moore, David DiLillo, and Kim L. Gratz. “Childhood Sexual Abuse and Fear of Abandonment Moderate the Relation of Intimate Partner Violence to Severity of Dissociation.” J Trauma Dissociation 19, no. 1 (January 2018): 9–24. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2017.1289491.

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McMahon, Kibby, Nathaniel R. Herr, Noga Zerubavel, Nicolas Hoertel, and Andrada D. Neacsiu. “Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Bipolar Depression.” Psychiatr Clin North Am 39, no. 1 (March 2016): 35–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2015.09.005.

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Messman-Moore, Terri, Rose Marie Ward, Noga Zerubavel, Rachel B. Chandley, and Sarah N. Barton. “Emotion dysregulation and drinking to cope as predictors and consequences of alcohol-involved sexual assault: examination of short-term and long-term risk.” J Interpers Violence 30, no. 4 (February 2015): 601–21. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260514535259.

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Zerubavel, N., and T. L. Messman-Moore. “Staying Present: Incorporating Mindfulness into Therapy for Dissociation.” Mindfulness 6, no. 2 (January 1, 2015): 303–14. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-013-0261-3.

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Zerubavel, N., and A. L. Adame. “Fostering Dialogue in Psychology: The Costs of Dogma and Theoretical Preciousness.” Qualitative Research in Psychology 11, no. 2 (April 1, 2014): 178–88. https://doi.org/10.1080/14780887.2013.864360.

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Zerubavel, Noga, and Terri L. Messman-Moore. “Sexual victimization, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation as barriers to sexual assertiveness in college women.” Violence Against Women 19, no. 12 (December 2013): 1518–37. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077801213517566.

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Walsh, Kate, Terri Messman-Moore, Noga Zerubavel, Rachel B. Chandley, Kathleen A. Denardi, and Dave P. Walker. “Perceived sexual control, sex-related alcohol expectancies and behavior predict substance-related sexual revictimization.” Child Abuse Negl 37, no. 5 (May 2013): 353–59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2012.11.009.

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