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Kathryn C Dickerson, PhD

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Division: 
Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Category: 
Office: 308 Research Drive, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708

Kathryn (Katie) Dickerson completed her B.A. in Brain and Cognitive Sciences from the University of Rochester in 2006. She then joined Dr. Mauricio Delgado's lab at Rutgers University-Newark earning her Ph.D. in Behavioral and Neural Sciences in 2011. She moved to Durham and joined the lab of Dr. Alison Adcock at Duke University where she was a post-doc from 2011-2016. She received a KL2 award in 2016 and was promoted to Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University.

Katie is interested in how reward and motivation influence what we learn and remember. She focuses on studying the dopamine system in healthy humans and clinical populations using a combination of behavioral, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and real-time fMRI methods. 

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., Rutgers University, 2011

Publications

Haugg, Amelie, Fabian M. Renz, Andrew A. Nicholson, Cindy Lor, Sebastian J. Götzendorfer, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, et al. “Predictors of real-time fMRI neurofeedback performance and improvement - A machine learning mega-analysis.” Neuroimage 237 (August 15, 2021): 118207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118207.

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Hakimi, Shabnam, Jeffrey J. MacInnes, Kathryn C. Dickerson, Kelsey McDonald, and R Alison Adcock. “Embedded Temporal Patterns in the Feedback Signal Differentially Predict VTA Neurofeedback-Mediated Learning to Self-Regulate Motivation.” In Neuropsychopharmacology, 45:378–79, 2020.

Scholars@Duke

Haugg, Amelie, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, Amalia McDonald, Cameron Craddock, Matthias Kirschner, Marcus Herdener, et al. “Can we predict real-time fMRI neurofeedback learning success from pretraining brain activity?” Hum Brain Mapp 41, no. 14 (October 1, 2020): 3839–54. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25089.

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MacInnes, Jeff J., R Alison Adcock, Andrea Stocco, Chantel S. Prat, Rajesh P. N. Rao, and Kathryn C. Dickerson. “Pyneal: Open Source Real-Time fMRI Software.” Front Neurosci 14 (2020): 900. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00900.

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Stanek, Jessica K., Kathryn C. Dickerson, Kimberly S. Chiew, Nathaniel J. Clement, and R Alison Adcock. “Expected Reward Value and Reward Uncertainty Have Temporally Dissociable Effects on Memory Formation.” J Cogn Neurosci 31, no. 10 (October 2019): 1443–54. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01411.

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Adcock, Rachel, Kathryn Dickerson, Jeff MacInnes, and R Alison Adcock. “144. Cognitive Neurostimulation: Volitional Regulation of Ventral Tegmental Area.” In Biological Psychiatry, 85:S60–S60. Elsevier BV, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.158.

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Dickerson, Kathryn, Katherine MacDuffie, Jeff MacInnes, Kari Eddington, Timothy Strauman, and R Alison Adcock. “Real-Time fMRI as a CBT Adjunct: Predicting the Behavioral Impact of Neurofeedback.” In Neuropsychopharmacology, 43:S125–26. NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018.

Scholars@Duke

Dickerson, Kathryn C. “Upregulating brain activity using non-drug reward imagery and real-time fMRI neurofeedback-A new treatment approach for addiction?” Ebiomedicine 38 (December 2018): 21–22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.11.021.

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Dickerson, Kathryn, Katherine MacDuffie, Jeff MacInnes, Kari Eddington, Timothy Strauman, and R Alison Adcock. “T157. Using Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback as a Tool for Demonstrating Therapeutic Efficacy.” In Biological Psychiatry, 83:S189–S189. Elsevier BV, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.02.494.

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Dickerson, Kathryn, and R Alison Adcock. “Motivation and Memory.” Stevens’ Handbook of Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119170174.epcn107.

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