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Edward Daniel Levin, PhD

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor in the Environmental Sciences and Policy Division
Associate Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
Division: 
Addiction
Category: 
Office: 323 Foster St, Durham, NC 27701
Campus Mail: DUMC Box 104790, Durham, NC 27710

Dr. Levin is Chief of the Neurobehavioral Research Lab in the Psychiatry Department of Duke University Medical Center. His primary academic appointment is as Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has secondary appointments in the Department Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke. His primary research effort is to understand basic neural interactions underlying cognitive function and addiction and to apply this knowledge to better understand cognitive dysfunction and addiction disorders and to develop novel therapeutic treatments.

The three main research components of his laboratory are focused on the themes of the basic neurobiology of cognition and addiction, neurobehavioral toxicology and the development of novel therapeutic treatments for cognitive dysfunction and substance abuse. Currently, our principal research focus concerns nicotine. We have documented the basic effects of nicotine on learningm memory and attention as well as nicotine self-administration. We are continuing with more mechanistic studies in rat models using selective lesions, local infusions and neurotransmitter interaction studies. We have found that nicotine improves memory performance not only in normal rats, but also in rats with lesions of hippocampal and basal forebrain connections. We are concentrating on alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor subtypes in the hippocampus, amygdala , thalamus and frontal cortex and how they interact with dopamine D1 and D2 and glutamate NMDA systems with regard to memory and addiction. I am also conducting studies on human cognitive behavior. We have current studies to assess nicotine effects on attention, memory and mental processing speed in schizophrenics, Alzheimer's Disease patients and people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In the area of neurobehavioral toxicology, I have continuing projects to characterize the adverse effects of prenatal and adolescent nicotine exposure. Our primary project in neurobehavioral toxicology focuses on the cognitive deficits caused by the marine toxins including domoic acid, ciguatera toxin and pfiesteria. We have documented a persistent neurobehavioral effects caused by Pfiesteria and domoic acid exposure. We are determining the neurobehavioral nature and mechanisms of this deficit. The basic and applied aims of our research complement each other nicely. The findings concerning neural mechanisms underlying cognitive function help direct the behavioral toxicology and therapeutic development studies, while the applied studies provide important functional information concerning the importance of the basic mechanisms under investigation.

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1984

Selected Grants

Publications

Massarsky, Andrey, Ayham Abdel, Lilah Glazer, Edward D. Levin, and Richard T. Di Giulio. “Exposure to 1,2-Propanediol Impacts Early Development of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Induces Hyperactivity.” Zebrafish 14, no. 3 (June 2017): 216–22. https://doi.org/10.1089/zeb.2016.1400.

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Hall, Brandon J., Yael Abreu-Villaça, Marty Cauley, Shaqif Junaid, Hannah White, Abtin Kiany, and Edward D. Levin. “The ventral hippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system plays a key role in sexual dimorphisms of spatial working memory in rats.” Neuropharmacology 117 (May 1, 2017): 106–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.01.019.

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Thriel, Christoph van, Ed Levin, Pam Lein, Lucio G. Costa, and Remco H. S. Westerink. “Neural mechanisms of functional impairment across the lifespan: The 15th Biennial Meeting of the International Neurotoxicology Association and 39th Annual Meeting of the Neurobehavioral Teratology Society.” Neurotoxicology 59 (March 2017): 131–32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2017.03.003.

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Abreu-Villaça, Yael, and Edward D. Levin. “Developmental neurotoxicity of succeeding generations of insecticides.” Environ Int 99 (February 2017): 55–77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.019.

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Macaulay, Laura J., Melissa Chernick, Albert Chen, David E. Hinton, Jordan M. Bailey, Seth W. Kullman, Edward D. Levin, and Heather M. Stapleton. “Exposure to a PBDE/OH-BDE mixture alters juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) development.” Environ Toxicol Chem 36, no. 1 (January 2017): 36–48. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.3535.

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Slotkin, Theodore A., Ashley Stadler, Samantha Skavicus, Jennifer Card, Jonathan Ruff, Edward D. Levin, and Frederic J. Seidler. “Is There a Critical Period for the Developmental Neurotoxicity of Low-Level Tobacco Smoke Exposure?” Toxicol Sci 155, no. 1 (January 2017): 75–84. https://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfw180.

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Rezvani, Amir H., Edward D. Levin, Marty Cauley, Bruk Getachew, and Yousef Tizabi. “Ketamine Differentially Attenuates Alcohol Intake in Male Versus Female Alcohol Preferring (P) Rats.” J Drug Alcohol Res 6 (2017). https://doi.org/10.4303/jdar/236030.

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Slotkin, Theodore A., Samantha Skavicus, Jennifer Card, Edward D. Levin, and Frederic J. Seidler. “Diverse neurotoxicants target the differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells into neuronal and glial phenotypes.” Toxicology 372 (November 30, 2016): 42–51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tox.2016.10.015.

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Petro, Ann, Hannah G. Sexton, Caroline Miranda, Anit Rastogi, Jonathan H. Freedman, and Edward D. Levin. “Persisting neurobehavioral effects of developmental copper exposure in wildtype and metallothionein 1 and 2 knockout mice.” Bmc Pharmacol Toxicol 17, no. 1 (November 2, 2016): 55. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40360-016-0096-3.

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Rezvani, Amir H., Marty C. Cauley, Susan Slade, Corinne Wells, Stanley Glick, Jed E. Rose, and Edward D. Levin. “Acute oral 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) decreases both alcohol intake and IV nicotine self-administration in rats.” Pharmacol Biochem Behav 150–151 (November 2016): 153–57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2016.10.010.

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