News Archive 2012

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Mental Health Services Erode as States Slash Budgets
Huffington Post
, December 31, 2012
Dr. Marvin Swartz is cited in an article in the Huffington Post about the difficulties of accessing mental health services and the resulting implications for our criminal justice system.

Are Spiritual Communities Healthier?
Huffington Post, December 28, 2012
A recent study by Duke Psychiatry's Dr. Harold Koenig revealed that older people who regularly attend religious services have elevated levels of a protein that indicates positive immune function.

Mass Murders: Why Us? Why the U.S.?
HealthDay, December 21, 2012
In regard to the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook elementary, Dr. Jeffrey Swanson, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains that "It's not one factor."

Better care for mentally ill won’t be enough, experts say
The Buffalo News, December 15, 2012
Dr. Marvin Swartz is quoted in this article discussing the challenges of identfying the risk of violent attacks such as Friday's school shooting in Connecticut.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Illness, fifth revision (DSM-V)
WUNC Public Radio, December 13, 2012
Dr. Dan Blazer discusses changes in the newly released DSM-V. He touches on the implications for patients and their insurance coverage, and more broadly, how this will impact the field of psychiatry.

Alzheimer's Diagnosis: More Tests Improve Chance Of Early Detection
Huffington Post, December 11, 2012
Duke research has demonstrated that employing more types of diagnostic tests is correlated with a reduction in the rate of misdiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

Mobile Technology Helps Health Providers Treat Spanish-Speaking Patients
Huffington Post, December 3, 2012
A new mobile app, Polyglot Med Spanish, created by the Duke Area Health Education Center (AHEC), offers immediate audio translation of over 3,000 common medical words, phrases, and assessment questions in English and Spanish.

Are humans getting dumber?
CBS News, November 24, 2012
Murali Doraiswamy, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, discusses a new theory that says humans are getting dumber due to dilution of the gene pool.

Baby Boomers face mental health care shortage
CNN, November 23, 2012
"Somewhere between five and eight million people today are suffering from mental health or substance abuse problems. That number is going to increase significantly as the Baby Boomers age," Dr. Dan Blazer, of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, is quoted in an interview.

Apes have mid-life crises too
ABC News, November 19, 2012
Redford Williams, M.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said a study suggesting that apes also reach an emotional low-point at midlife means hope for humans. "Don't worry if you are having a mid-life slump. Don't feel too guilty. It has a biological basis."

Gratitude helps with health and happiness
Reporter Herald, November 17, 2012
Research by P. Murali Doraiswamy, M.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, suggests that positive mental habits, such as being thankful, can improve both your physical and mental well-being.

Answers About Alzheimer's - Part 2
New York Times, November 16, 2012
Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy continues to answer readers' questions related to Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss. Part 2 addresses diagnostic issues, the role played by genetics, causes and policy issues.

Answers About Alzheimer's - Part 1
New York Times, November 15, 2012
New York Times' Ask the Expert column featured Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, who answered readers' questions related to Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss. He is a professor of psychiatry at Duke and an author of “The Alzheimer’s Action Plan.”

'Predrinking' nearly doubles booze consumption: Study

U.S. News & World Report, November 8, 2012
Scott Swartzwelder, Ph.D., professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said the behavior of 'predrinking' -- consuming alcohol at home before drinking at a bar -- raises questions about the drinking age. "There's a reasonable hypothesis that if you can drink legally, you'll be less likely to pile drinks on in your dorm room before you go out" to places where you cannot drink legally, he said.

PTSD Linked to Smaller Part of Brain
WUNC North Carolina Public Radio, November 6, 2012
Raj Morey, professor of psychiatry, recently uncovered an association between the size of the Amygdala and occurance of PTSD in combat veterans. "I think this is just one piece of that puzzle that we will try to create to kind of define what are all the factors that constitute a vulnerability." Morey says eventually, a knowledge of all those factors could make it possible to target treatment more effectively.

Quitting smoking: Why some stop alone, others need aid
Richmond Times Dispatch, November 4, 2012
"You have those different categories of folks for whom different treatment works...It might be those folks could have quit sooner had they come in for help," says Swartzwelder, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences who studies addiction at Duke's Center for Smoking Cessation.

Antidepressants during pregnancy can be tricky
CNN Health News, October 31, 2012
For years, pregnant women who suffer from depression have been told that it is safer for them and their unborn child to continue taking antidepressants during pregnancy. Now a new study is challenging that advice. However, Marla Wald, a psychiatrist at Duke University Medical Center who specializes in perinatal and women's mental health, warns: "you're going to run the risk of letting mom slide into postpartum depression when perhaps you could have prevented this if you'd started treatment earlier."

Lifelong smoking cuts women's lives by a decade
ABC Nightly News, October 26, 2012
Jed Rose, PhD, Director of the Duke Center for Nicotine and Smoking Cessation Research and Medical Research Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, appeared on NBC Nightly News discussing how lifelong smoking impacts women's health.

Adult picky eaters will only consume three kinds of food
Good Morning America, October 26, 2012
“We don’t quite understand what adult picky eating is…but what we do know is that there is a real biological struggle going on that’s not all in their heads,” said Nancy Zucker, director of the Center for Eating Disorders at Duke University Medical Center, who studies picky eaters.

As more people meditate, more realize its benefits
News & Observer, August 27, 2012
“It’s all about mindfulness,” said Dr. Ron Vereen, a Durham psychiatrist and one of the Duke instructors. “Most people have probably experienced it, when we’re out in nature, and for a moment, we’re at one with what’s happening. …That kind of paying attention – on purpose, in the present moment, with non-judgmental awareness – it’s different from ordinary attention.”

Lilly Alzheimer's Drug Disappoints in Trials
Wall Street Journal, August 25, 2012
"Given that even their . . . primary outcome failed, Lilly's interpretation of the data must be viewed with caution till they undergo independent peer review" and are replicated, said P. Murali Doraiswamy, a Duke University professor involved in many Alzheimer's clinical trials.

Detective Work: The False Alzheimer's Diagnosis
Wall Street Journal, August 28, 2012
“It isn't just primary-care physicians who may miss underlying conditions. "Every Alzheimer's expert living today has been fooled," says P. Murali Doraiswamy, chief of biological psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C.

Curaxis is not alone in failing on Alzheimer's
Triangle Business Journal, August 24, 2012
Duke University, through its Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, is also honing in on the disease. Center Director Kathleen Welsh-Bohmer says a phase 3 trial studying the impacts of diet and exercise on disease progression is the current focus. The center is also about to start a global phase 3 study aiming to prevent the onset of the disease by looking at a compound that impacts metabolism.

The Law — And Reality — Of Gun Access
National Public Radio, August 15, 2012
Jeff Swanson, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said that any system that would seek to prevent the severely mentally ill from possessing firearms "that relies on searching official records may never find these individuals. There are lots of people who have an involuntary commitment history who have virtually zero risk of violence."

Controlling Gun Violence
WUNC – The State of Things, August 15, 2012
Jeffrey Swanson, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said "epidemological study suggests that a very small proportion of violence in general is attributable to serious mental health conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder."

The Penalty for Traumatic Brain Injury? Execution
The Wall Street Journal, August 6, 2012
Duke research by a multidisciplinary team that included Bruce Capehart, MD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, suggests that 10 percent of 300 cases of World War I soldiers executed for cowardice or desertion had experienced traumatic brain injury.

Duke researchers look to World War I soldiers for clues about traumatic brain injuries
News & Observer, August 5, 2012
Bruce Capehart, MD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said that "what this research can tell is that maybe some of these cases we thought of as post-traumatic stress disorder were traumatic brain injury and that we kind of missed that difference over the years."

Exercise Could Decrease Depression Among Heart Failure Patients: Study
Huffington Post, August 5, 2012
James Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said the results could be achieved with "about three, 30-minute sessions for an accumulated 90 minutes a week."

Exercise May Ease Depression Tied to Heart Failure
U.S. News & World Report, August 3, 2012
James Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said Duke research showed that exercise can help ease depression symptoms in people with chronic heart failure.

More Evidence that Exercise May Help Treat Depression
TIME, August 1, 2012
James A. Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said that Duke research shows that exercise itself can actually improve mood and motivation as well, particularly for people with heart failure.

Exercise May Fight Depression in Heart Failure
WebMD, July 31, 2012
James A. Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said Duke research showed that in addition to providing its known physical benefits, exercise also reduced depression in heart failure patients.

Exercise may help ease depression in heart failure
Reuters, July 31, 2012
James A. Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, while noting that Duke research showed that exercise helped boost physical and mental health in heart failure patients, said that "before anyone starts an exercise routine they should really consult their doctor."

Exercise May Ease Depression in Heart Failure Patients
New York Times, July 31, 2012
James A. Blumenthal, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said that Duke research shows that "for patients who have heart failure, exercise is certainly an excellent treatment."

Exercise Boosts Mental and Physical Health of Heart Failure Patients
Duke Medicine Press Release, July 31, 2012
Moderate exercise helps ease depression in patients with chronic heart failure, and is also associated with a small but significant reduction in deaths and hospitalizations, according to a large, international study led by James Blumenthal, PhD.

'Snapshot' glasses improve visual memory
United Press International, July 25, 2012
Greg Appelbaum, PhD, a cognitive neuroscientist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said Duke research showed that "wearing the strobe eyewear during the physical training seemed to boost the ability to retain information."

Looking into the minds of killers
CNN, July 24, 2012
Jeff Swanson, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, authored an article on the shooting in Aurora, Colorado. In the article, Dr. Swanson encourages people to not speculate on the motives and mental health of James Holmes without having adequate information.

Strobe Eyewear Training Improves Visual Memory
Duke TODAY, July 24, 2012
Greg Appelbaum, PhD, a cognitive neuroscientist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, studies the use of vision-limiting goggles to determine if this eyewear can improve visual memory. "Humans have a memory buffer in their brain that keeps information alive for a certain short-lived period," said Appelbaum. "Wearing the strobe eyewear during the physical training seemed to boost the ability to retain information in this buffer."

Strobe-goggle catch boosts memory
New Scientist, July 24, 2012
Greg Appelbaum, PhD, a cognitive neuroscientist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, studies the use of vision-limiting goggles to determine if this eyewear can improve visual memory.

Massacre suspect recently began to struggle
Tampa Bay Times, July 21, 2012
Jeffrey Swanson, PhD, an expert on violence and mental illness, comments in this article on the shooting in Aurora, Colorado. "[The shooters] tend to be young and male and tend to be sort of isolated. The problem with that is that there are tens of thousands of people who meet the same description and never do anything like this," Swanson said.

James Holmes, held in Colorado shooting, had academic promise but was struggling
Washington Post, July 20, 2012
Jeffrey Swanson, PhD, an expert on violence and mental illness, comments in this article about why someone becomes a mass killer. "They tend to be young and male and tend to be sort of isolated. The problem with that is that there are tens of thousands of people who meet the same description and never do anything like this," Swanson said.

Immune Drug Shows Promise for Alzheimer's
Wall Street Journal, July 17, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head of the Division of Biological Psychiatry, is quoted in this article on a study suggesting that a medicine used for immune disorders may offer long-term benefits to Alzheimer's patients. "The growing off-label demand for Alzheimer's could threaten supply for immunodeficient patients," he said.

Stress of Life in the Public Eye Might Have Fueled Jackson's Mood Disorder, Doctors Say
ABC News, July 12, 2012
Harold G. Koenig, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said the pressure alone from being in a family forever in the spotlight might have become too much for Jackson.

Alzheimer's plaques in PET brain scans identify future cognitive decline
Duke Medicine Press Release, July 11, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head the Division of Biological Psychiatry, said that Duke research shows that "even at a short follow-up of 18 months we can see how the presence of amyloid plaques affects cognitive function."

Brain Scans Using New Dye May Predict Alzheimer's
U.S. News & World Report, July 11, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head the Division of Biological Psychiatry, said that Duke research shows that "even at a short follow-up of 18 months we can see how the presence of amyloid plaques affects cognitive function."

New dye may lead to earlier Alzheimer's diagnosis
CBS News, July 11, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head the Division of Biological Psychiatry, said that Duke research shows that "even at a short follow-up of 18 months we can see how the presence of amyloid plaques affects cognitive function."

Study: Brain scans can detect early dementia
Herald-Sun, July 11, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head of the Division of Biological Psychiatry, said Duke research shows that brain scans with a new radioactive dye can detect early evidence of Alzheimer's disease. "For the most part we have been blind about who would progress and who wouldn't, so this approach is a step toward having a biomarker that predicts risk of decline," Doraiswamy said.

Predicting the Course of Alzheimer's
ABC News, July 11, 2012
P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, head the Division of Biological Psychiatry, commented on a study of Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Disease.

Duke researchers: silver tsunami coming
North Carolina News Network, July 11, 2012
Dan Blazer, MD, PhD, J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, discussed an Institute of Medicine report he co-authored. "We have an inadequate workforce from the specialists, for example, from the geriatrics psychiatrists all the way down to the direct care workers," said Blazer.

Report: Too little mental health care for seniors
Associated Press, July 10, 2012
Dan Blazer, MD, PhD, J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said, "the burden of mental illness and substance abuse disorders in older adults in the United States borders on a crisis."

IOM: Elderly need better access to mental health, substance abuse care
CNN, July 10, 2012
Dan G. Blazer, MD, PhD, J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said, "there is a conspicuous lack of national attention to ensuring that there is a large enough health care work force trained to care for older adults with mental health and substance use conditions."

Substance Abuse on the Rise Among Seniors
Wall Street Journal, July 10, 2012
Dan Blazer, MD, PhD, J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, discussed an Institute of Medicine report and said, “The burden of mental health and substance use is large and will get larger.”

The Takeaway: 1 in 5 Older Adults Have Mental Health Or Substance Abuse Issues
AARP Blog, July 10, 2012
Dan Blazer, MD, PhD, J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, said, "the burden of mental illness and substance abuse disorders in older adults in the United States borders on a crisis."

When My Crazy Father Actually Lost His Mind
New York Times Magazine, June 22, 2012

Stress is Healthy? Rat Study Shows Boost to Immune System
ABC News, June 22, 2012

Heart Attacks and PTSD: A Vicious Cycle
ABC News, June 20, 2012

Informed consent: A broken contract
Nature, June 20, 2012

The rewards and challenges of treating psychiatric patients
Today’s Hospitalist, June 2012

New Sleep Drug Works in Early Studies
WebMD, June 13, 2012

Merck sleep drug hits most goals of pivotal trials
Reuters, June 13, 2012

Depressed Teens Who Respond to Treatment Less Likely to Abuse Drugs
U.S. News & World Report, June 7, 2012

Depression Treatment Can Prevent Adolescent Drug Abuse
Duke TODAY, June 4, 2012

Genetic testing: Does Kristen Powers have mom's fatal gene?
USA Today, June 2, 2012

Mental Health and Children
The State of Things - WUNC-FM, May 30, 2012

Durham Health Summit 2012
Inside Duke Medicine, May 2012

For obesity, a dose of doctoring
The News & Observer, May 29, 2012

Family counters flesh-eating bacteria with faith
CNN, May 29, 2012

Documenting Medicine
Duke TODAY, May 29, 2012

How the Scent of Fear May Be Picked Up by Others
The New York Times, May 28, 2012

After the Bullying
Duke TODAY, May 25, 2012

Drug Dangers
The People’s Pharmacy, May 19, 2012

Advances in shock therapy helping patients with depression
WRAL-TV, May 16, 2012

Diagnosing the D.S.M.
The New York Times, May 11, 2012

Addiction Diagnoses May Rise Under Guideline Changes
The New York Times, May 11, 2012

Psychiatrists say diagnosis manual needs overhaul
Reuters, May 10, 2012

Psychiatry Manual Drafters Back Down on Diagnoses
The New York Times, May 8, 2012

Commuting Drives Up Weight, Blood Pressure
ABC News, May 8, 2012

Duke Announces 2012 Distinguished Professors
Duke University Press Release, May 7, 2012

Virtual world helps returning soldiers battle addiction
WRAL-TV, May 3, 2012

DSM-5 Field Trial Results a Hot Topic at APA 2012 Meeting
Medscape, May 3, 2012

Shock therapy: New twist on an old treatment
WNDU-TV, May 1, 2012

Computerized Training Boosts Cognition in Schizophrenia
Medscape, April 30, 2012

Smoking Thwarts Positive Outcomes in Opioid Addiction
Medscape, April 29, 2012

A “Pacemaker” for Mental Illness?
DukeMed Alumni News (p. 16), Spring 2012

The Health Services Research Senior Scholar Award
Psychiatric Research Report, Spring 2012

Can Teens Game Away Their Depression?
ABC News, April 19, 2012

Can Optimism Ward Off Heart Ills?
ABC News, April 18, 2012

Don't Let Stress Break Your Heart
Duke Medicine Connect, April 12, 2012

Alzheimer's Disease: Dutch Village Doubles as Nursing Home
ABC News, April 11, 2012

New View of Depression: An Ailment of the Entire Body
The Wall Street Journal, April 9, 2012

Chronic Stress Feeds Common Cold, Study Finds
ABC News, April 2, 2012

Delirium Due to Medical Cause Often Misdiagnosed as Psychiatric Disorder
Family Practice News, March 30, 2012

Sleep apnea puts patients at risk for delirium after surgery
Duke Medicine Press Release, March 27, 2012

Study probes connection between religiosity and depression
The Duke Chronicle, March 19, 2012

Triangle Alzheimer’s experts hope cancer drug helps
The News & Observer, March 13, 2012

DSM-5 Criticized for Financial Conflicts of Interest
ABC News, March 13, 2012

Duke Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Launches New Mental Health Clinic and Research Facility
March 6, 2012

The People’s Pharmacy
WUNC-FM, March 3, 2012

Pickiness: The Secret Eating Disorder Nobody’s Talking About
Newsweek/The Daily Beast, March 1, 2012

Memory Lapses: What's Normal, What's Not
Family Circle, March 1, 2012

Study questions religion-depression link
Reuters, February 28, 2012

Fear of punitive response to hospital errors lingers
American Medical News, February 20, 2012

Alzheimer’s and Families with Lisa Gwyther
Your Health Radio, February 11, 2012

Shyness an illness in "dangerous" health book-experts
Reuters, February 9, 2012

Blood Test May Help Diagnose Depression
ABC News, February 2, 2012

Lilly Alzheimer's drug an unlikely ace in the hole
Reuters, February 2, 2012

Both teens drunk in fatal Raleigh crash
The News & Observer, February 1, 2012

Study shows 20 percent of Americans have a mental illness
Duke Chronicle, January 27, 2012

The Shock That Could Save Your Life
Doctor Oz Show, January 25, 2012

Duke Camp (And Dog) Help Children Cope With Loss
Duke TODAY, January 25, 2012

Grief Could Join List of Disorders
The New York Times, January 25, 2012

When Stress Is Good for You
The Wall Street Journal, January 24, 2012

Psychiatric Group Push to Redefine Mental Illness Sparks Revolt
Bloomberg News, January 24, 2012

Treating Depression With Electroconvulsive Therapy
DoctorOz.com, January 23, 2012

I Disclose…Nothing
The New York Times, January 21, 2012

Government survey finds that 5 percent of Americans suffer from a ‘serious mental illness’
The Washington Post, January 19, 2012

12 Ways to Avoid Diabetes
ABC News, January 19, 2012

Study: Babies try lip-reading in learning to talk
USA Today, January 17, 2012

Motivation Monday: Avoid those snack traps
KARE11.com, January 16, 2012

Martin Luther King Day: How to tell your kids about the death of MLK
The Grio/MSNBC, January 15, 2012

America Is Over Diagnosed and Over Medicated
Huffington Post, January 9, 2012

Nicotine aids found not effective long term
Boston Globe, January 9, 2012

Recovering After Horrific Loss
ABC News, January 5, 2012

Inflammation in depression: Chicken or egg?
Biological Psychiatry Press Release, January 5, 2012

Eat Your Veggies!
WebMD, January 3, 2012

Caffeine craving is in the genes
The News & Observer, January 1, 2012